Author: Rhodes

Management

Celebrating the 34th Anniversary of My Diabetes Diagnosis

This week, Rhodes is celebrating the 34th anniversary of his diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes – October 10, 1983. He shares a few things he has learned over the last three decades in this video. We have some additional lessons we have learned along the way that we would like to share with you:  Find […]

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Management

What is Your Hemoglobin A1C?

Rhodes explains the meaning of the hemoglobin A1C blood test. Often used to diagnose and manage diabetes, the A1C tells your average blood sugar over a three month period. Every person will have a different target, which you should determine with your doctor. But in general, diabetics strive to keep their A1C below 6.5%.

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Tools

Being Prepared to Treat Low Blood Sugar

You should always travel with your glucometer, but when there is risk of low blood sugar, you don’t want to leave home without being prepared. Rhodes recommends always carrying glucose tablets for quick-acting carbs, and a snack to help keep your blood sugar at a safe level. He opts for a granola bar with 18 […]

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Management

Should You Visit an Endocrinologist?

Diabetics can be treated by their family doctor, a general practitioner, or by a specialist called an endocrinologist. If you are not satisfied with your diabetes care in any way, Rhodes recommends seeing an endocrinologist. He sees his endo every three months, and finds that the doctor’s specialized knowledge and longer appointments are helpful.

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Management

Defining Type I Diabetes

Rhodes is a Type 1 diabetic (“T1D”), also commonly called juvenile diabetes, though not all persons are diagnosed as children. T1Ds are typically insulin dependent, so their pancreas doesn’t produce any insulin to regulate blood sugar. As a result, most T1Ds must take regular insulin injections or receive insulin through an insulin pump.

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Management

Defining Type II Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes (“T2D”) is becoming more and more common around the world. About ninety percent of all diabetes diagnoses are Type 2, or adult onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetics may simply not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar, or the insulin they do produce may not regulate blood sugar efficiently. T2D is typically […]

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Management

Lowering High Blood Sugar

High blood sugar can be dangerous, but also can make you feel lethargic and foggy. Insulin and medication may be your first line of defense, but then Rhodes recommends drinking a lot of water and getting some exercise to help bring blood sugar down.

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Tools

Keeping a Health Journal

Rhodes thinks that recording your blood sugars, food intake, exercise, medication and a few other factors in a health journal is critical to good diabetes management. A health journal (also known as a log or tracking) will help keep you accountable, and will also help your doctors and health care team evaluate how to better […]

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Tools

Lancing Devices

The lancet is the “pricker” used to draw blood for the glucose meter that tests blood sugar. They all essentially work the same, but most have a few key features. Rhodes talks about adjusting the depth of the lancet needle, and changing the lancet.

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Management

Importance of Testing Your Blood Sugar

Pricking your finger and testing your blood sugar is not fun. If you are newly diabetic it can be painful, expensive, and time-consuming. Rhodes wants to encourage you to check your blood sugar as often as your doctor recommends, and perhaps even more often. Blood sugar testing is the key to good diabetes management. If […]

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