Diabetes Minute: May 2016

Management

What is Your Hemoglobin A1C?

Rhodes explains the meaning of the hemoglobin A1C blood test. Often used to diagnose and manage diabetes, the A1C tells your average blood sugar over a three month period. Every person will have a different target, which you should determine with your doctor. But in general, diabetics strive to keep their A1C below 6.5%.

Posted by Rhodes
Tools

Being Prepared to Treat Low Blood Sugar

You should always travel with your glucometer, but when there is risk of low blood sugar, you don’t want to leave home without being prepared. Rhodes recommends always carrying glucose tablets for quick-acting carbs, and a snack to help keep your blood sugar at a safe level. He opts for a granola bar with 18 […]

Posted by Rhodes
Management

Sugar Free vs. No Sugar Added Foods

There are many new products and foods claiming to be “diabetic friendly.” Do you understand the difference between “sugar-free” and “no-sugar added” foods? Alana sorts through the differences.

Posted by Alana
Management

Simple Food Swaps

Trying to make better food choices? Alana suggests a few easy food swaps to lower your carb intake. An easy but important swap is to avoid regular sodas and juices, and choose flavored or sparkling waters, teas sweetened with sugar substitutes, or diet sodas.

Posted by Alana
Support Team

Asking, “Should You Be Eating That?”

There may be no question a person with diabetes hates more than “Should you be eating that?” It sounds critical, when you are probably just trying to be helpful. Alana gives some hints for asking the question at the right time in the right way.

Posted by Alana
Management

Should You Visit an Endocrinologist?

Diabetics can be treated by their family doctor, a general practitioner, or by a specialist called an endocrinologist. If you are not satisfied with your diabetes care in any way, Rhodes recommends seeing an endocrinologist. He sees his endo every three months, and finds that the doctor’s specialized knowledge and longer appointments are helpful.

Posted by Rhodes
Management

Defining Type I Diabetes

Rhodes is a Type 1 diabetic (“T1D”), also commonly called juvenile diabetes, though not all persons are diagnosed as children. T1Ds are typically insulin dependent, so their pancreas doesn’t produce any insulin to regulate blood sugar. As a result, most T1Ds must take regular insulin injections or receive insulin through an insulin pump.

Posted by Rhodes
Management

Defining Type II Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes (“T2D”) is becoming more and more common around the world. About ninety percent of all diabetes diagnoses are Type 2, or adult onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetics may simply not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar, or the insulin they do produce may not regulate blood sugar efficiently. T2D is typically […]

Posted by Rhodes
Tools

Getting the Most From Your Doctors’ Appointments

Doctor’s appointments can be stressful or leave you frustrated and confused. We recommend writing down all your questions or concerns in advance, and telling the doctor that you have a list you would like to get through. We also recommend trying to take a family member or friend with you for a second set of […]

Posted by Alana
Management

Lowering High Blood Sugar

High blood sugar can be dangerous, but also can make you feel lethargic and foggy. Insulin and medication may be your first line of defense, but then Rhodes recommends drinking a lot of water and getting some exercise to help bring blood sugar down.

Posted by Rhodes